Friday, February 3, 2012

FriedEnglish: Video Grading using Google Docs and Jing (Faster, Easier, and Better for Students)

GRADE or COMMENT on ANYTHING . . . FAST, EASY, BETTER for STUDENTS=Grading FRIED


Yesterday I had a great idea that I think is going to save me tons of hours AND be better for my students. I'm SO EXCITED that I had to share it with you right away. Hope you enjoy it! Please let me know if you're able to use Video Grading in your classroom.


Video Grading uses screencasting to record a video of the student's digital work while the teacher talks to the student about that work. It can be used with any medium (including multi-media projects). Anything the teacher sees on the screen can be recorded and commented upon so that the student can play back his/her specific commentary. Please see the video below for the steps and an example and use the links below to get ready to video grade.

1. Download Jing from Techsmith (used in the video above) or familiarize yourself with another screencasting tool like the sophisticated by pricey Camtasia (also from Techsmith) or the free online Screenr (which to my knowledge cannot be password protected . . . beware FERPA violations). 

2. Provided you are using Jing or Camtasia, create a Screencast account or log in with your Jing credentials if you have already been using that product. 

3. Create a folder in your Screencast account, then password protect it. The specific steps are show in the video above.

4. Set up your microphone and do a little test where you record a tiny portion of your screen and talk into it. Play the test back to make sure your microphone works. If you're using Jing, here's where you find the preferences to choose which mic to use:
I highly recommend buying a mic similar to this. Your sound will be much better and your experience recording much more comfortable:
5. I don't do test runs. If I were talking to a student in person, I wouldn't do a test run for that, and so I don't do a test run for recording a grading session either. In fact, in all of the hundreds of screencasts I've made (see them HERE and HEREhttp://www.screencast.com/users/FriedTechnology/folders/Jing), I haven't done a test run. Don't go for perfection. It will take all the fun out of video grading. Just be yourself. 

6. If you have any questions about video grading, or anything instructional technology related, please feel free to email me here.

23 comments:

Jess said...

Genius friend! I love this method. I wish I was teaching English again, too! I am emailing my dept chairs now to set up times to show them this great technique!

Amy J. Mayer said...

Yipee! Let me know how it goes!

Eric said...

Fantastic! I've just finished correcting a number of college papers. The only issue I'm concerned about is that I'll have to delete all corrections by the end of the term... But students will have plenty of time to take any notes they need.
Regards,
Eric Yamagute
Brazil

Sanders said...

Love it! What do you know about Google Docs and FERPA issues? We were recently discouraged from putting any private student info in Google docs.

Amy Mayer said...

Hey Sanders! Great to hear from you. The edit not to use Google because of FERPA issues stems from one of two misunderstandings. 1: That Google Docs are public . . . not the case, obviously. They are private unless shared. or 2: That FERPA requires us not to put student information online. Also not the case. The requirement is to protect it. Google provides protected storage. If an institution is uneasy about storing files in the "regular" Google, have them look into Google Apps, free for universities as well as K-12s, and provides clear assurances for protection and ownership of data. Hope that helps!

P Cadwalder said...

This is such as great idea Amy. We have a teacher at our middle school that uses Jing feedback videos with Edmodo. It works really well.

krainer said...

Hi Amy,
I used it and it's fantastic for quick tutorials for online forms and editing news articles. I love it.

Thanks
Kenneth

Also, I'm now a huge fan of Prezi.

krainer said...

Hi Amy,

I used this tool to do short clips of how to fill out online forms/Google doc forms (SOP fashion. I can see using this to edit media releases as well.

Thanks
Kenneth

Also, I'm a huge fan of Prezi now thank you :)

kath said...

I grade with Camtasia as needed.

Laura B said...

Great idea! Screencastomatic is another great tool that I've use in the classroom. If you pay 12 dollars(a great deal!) for the pro version, then you can password protect the video. They can be posted straight to Youtube, you can save them as an mp4, or save it on their website.

Amy J. Mayer said...

@krainer Thanks Kenneth! It's nice to see someone outside the edu field reading this blog and using the ideas. SOOO glad you're loving Prezi!

Donna Baumbach said...

Where have you been all my life? BRILLIANT! And just in time for my final projects. I had thought of using Jing once, but NEVER thought about the pause button (DUH!) and I didn't want to write my thoughts and then record them. This is going to help me and surprise them!

THANK YOU!

BTW, I can't find your Pinterest boards...

Amy J. Mayer said...

@Donna WOW! Thanks! So glad you enjoyed it. You can find me on Pinterest here: http://pinterest.com/amymayer/

Amy J. Mayer said...

@Laura B: WOW! Great advise! Thanks for letting me know that. I'll make sure to add that to my presentation on the topic!

gttechguru said...

Love this idea. I remember you sharing it at TCEA... I'm using jing in another way. I'm having my kids make pecha kucha video of their year's philosophy work. Which is 20, 20 sec videos. Many of them wanted to turn their prezi's into videos for this project. So I thought of you! But I'm having trouble figuring out the best way to get them into a format that can be edited in something like movie maker (sadly we don't have imovie), or another web based video editor. No luck with any video converter... my usual go to. Any ideas on the best way to convert the swf file to editable movie files?

Amy Mayer said...

@gttechguru That sounds cool! What is pecha kucha? It is hard to get Flash videos into an editable format. I have not found a free way to do it. I bet you could with Camtasia, and they have a 30 day trial. Worth a try!

Kim said...

Pecha Kucha is a way of presenting that basically means 20 slides and 20 seconds per slide. So in a power point world (one I try to stay out of)the slide would transition automatically after 20 seconds and the speaker would move on. Wouldn't it be great if they did STAAR training that way. Anyways it is becoming a thing... they even have pecha kucha nights all over the world. http://www.pecha-kucha.org/ So we did a spin on it and are doing a movies instead. I wish prezi had timed transitions. Thanks for the tip. 30 days is just long enough to finish the project.

Amy Mayer said...

I feel so cool now because I know what Pecha Kucha is. Unfortunately, I do not know how to say it.

Peh-cha Koo-cha? I guess?

Very cool. Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge.

Studio 113 said...

Thanks for the detailed instructions here. Very helpful. I've used Audacity to record MP3's of my graded AP Language essays and Jing for screencasting teacher/student tutorials, but this takes my project-based assessments to another level. Cool stuff. @JohnHardison1

Judy said...

For any of you, do these feedback methods take more time? Do you get into a flow?

Amy J. Mayer said...

Judy: I used this technique for the college English class I taught this last Spring, and I found this easier and faster than commenting on essays and much more descriptive when students made multi-media or other technology products. Hope that helps! -Amy

Daryl Bambic said...

Funny, my colleague and I were just talking about this last week at the BLC conference in Boston. I told her about how I used to do this using Audacity and refer to 'line number' but that was longer than doing this. I know some of our teachers are going to try this one out.

Bob Sprankle said...

What a ggreat idea!